Computing Progress logo
Community Supported

This scheme of work is a suggestion for KS3.  It can be delivered to all year groups, with differentiation via outcomes, though the focus is more towards Year 9.  Since this specification is new to all years, these will be introductory elements mostly.  The () numbers at the beginning of the Assessment Criteria designate which unit it comes from.  There is also a link from there to our Guidance on Interpreting Criteria.  Most of the graphics in the body of the notes section link to web sites.  It is recommended to use these in conjunction with our on-line Mark-Book and Learning Site in order to generate evidence to earn our Ofqual regulated qualifications.

Note: Lesson Plan links will appear as they are completed.  The BBC logo is always a useful place to look for resources, as well as CAS.  This site crowdlearn is generally useful for practicing programming skills.

Link to Suggested Lesson Plans

Assessment Criteria and Guidance Basic Objectives Lesson Focus / Style Notes and Suggested Resources

Block 1

1

(1) 2.7 I can identify situations where codes control events and record physical data

Introduce the notion of using computer programs to collect data and control other devices Overview, instruction

Oscilloscope image For this criterion, students need to be introduced to a range of devices and machines which are controlled by computers or use computers to collect and store data.

They can explore 3D printers in DT or scientific measuring equipment.

2

(1) 2.7 I can identify situations where codes control events and record physical data

  Practical, active

Aido graphic  If possible, a field trip to a local manufacturing firm to show the fine control of computer aided systems would be useful.  A local design company can show the link between CAD/CAM and the finished product from the fabrication machines.

Something like flowol would be useful to practice how program code affects real world objects.

3

(1) 4.1 I can predict the outcome of statements containing AND, NOT and OR in information searches

Introduce and explore the use of operational statements.  Can concentrate on using each one in sequence and cataloging the results. Overview

Add graphic The students need some practice here to master these fundamental elements of programming logic.  They should be comfortable using them and being able to confidently predict outcomes as a result of their individual use and in combination.

4

(1) 4.1 I can predict the outcome of statements containing AND, NOT and OR in information searches

  Practical, active

Not equal to graphic Students need to show that they can use these effectively and efficiently in their work.  What results will they get with individual operators, compared to combinations.  How precise are their predictions.

5

(1) 4.1 I can predict the outcome of statements containing AND, NOT and OR in information searches   Practical, active

Red cross and green tick icons How much flexibility does adding OR give to statements.  When might it be used.  What are some of the advantages and disadvantages.

6

(1) 4.2 I can include AND, NOT and OR in information searches Introduction and practical experience of the power of operators when used in searches. Overview

Magnifying glass graphic When searching for information, given the huge volume now available on the Internet or even on Intranets, how can we use the built in tools of programs to help us.

This site Computer Hope logo gives some useful tips to help, as does this one.

7

(1) 4.2 I can include AND, NOT and OR in information searches   Practical, active

Open book graphic Continuation of exploring the power of operators and the experience of knowing how and when to use them.

The Internet is a busy place, Internet Live Stats logo, how do you manage all of this?

8

(1) 4.4 I can relate boolean logic to program flow Introduction to boolean as a concept. Overview

George Boole image What has George Boole ever done for us?  At its core, a computer can only deal with 2 things: true or false.  Therefore, boolean operators like AND, NOT and OR help to make sure that only true or false statements are dealt with.

IF (boolean condition) THEN
    (consequent)
 ELSE
    (alternative)
 END IF

9

(1) 4.4 I can relate boolean logic to program flow   Practical, active

Captcha graphic IF someone copies the code correctly, THEN it is probably not a robot, so complete application, ELSE they can't copy it, stop the application.  END.

The latest Google reCAPTCHA method looks for human movements in order to detect non-computer input.

Google reCAPTCHA

10

(1) 4.4 I can relate boolean logic to program flow   Practical, active

Power switch graphic Students can explore previous programming projects they have made or look at some Open Source program source code and look for the use of these boolean operators and explain their use and meaning in their blogs or e-portfolios.

Here is some Scratch logo source code from github.  Recognise anything?

11

(1) 4.6 I can represent numbers using binary patterns An introduction and deeper dive into the base of all computing: binary. Overview

Binary file graphicStudents should have a reasonable awareness that computer "speak" is binary.  The computer signal is either off or on.  When I type A on my keyboard, the computer sees 01000001. While students don't need to speak in hexadecimal for this criterion, it would be useful for them to show familiarity with the main principles.

The Warriors on the Net animation (YouTube video) is good at showing the life and travel of binary digits.

12

(1) 4.6 I can represent numbers using binary patterns   Practical, active

Binary wave graphic Students can practice trying to work with binary calculators such as the ones used for network domain construction.  The BBC website becomes 212.58.244.18, which then translates in binary to 11010100.00111010.11110100.00010010.  Thank goodness for DNS!

Try some IP addresses with this converter.

A great story about the power of binary, known in different cultures, is the story of the rice reward.  This could be done kinesthetically with actual rice.  In a class of 30, if each next person has twice as much rice as the last, and the first person has 1 grain, how much will the 30th person have?

13

(1) 4.6 I can represent numbers using binary patterns   Practical, active

Network Switch graphic Students can be given the opportunity to work on binary patterns to transcode them into their 8 bit numbers.  This is quite a practical way of understanding the relationship between binary patterns and numbers.

165 = 10100101

1 2 4 8 16 32 64 128
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1

Block 2

Link to Suggested Lesson Plan Assessment Criteria and Guidance Basic Objectives Lesson Focus / Style Notes and Suggested Resources

14

(2) 4.1 I can identify licenses that are restrictive The next group of criteria introduce and consolidate the student's understanding of licenses and copyright Overview

Copyright graphic Students need to be shown, be able to discuss, and to understand and appreciate, copyright and licensing issues.  The first criterion here looks at what they are not allowed to do with software which they believe they own.  This should be an introduction to what software licenses mean and achieve.

If you have just purchased a new computer and it has Microsoft Office installed, what are you allowed to do?  eula 

Look at page 1, How can I use the software?  What happens if you sell the computer?  Who has the license now?

15

(2) 4.1 I can identify licenses that are restrictive   Practical, active

Legal scales graphic Students need to be able to identify license restrictions and know when they can use alternatives which will free their work up and allow it to be shared.  TLM uses non restrictive licenses on all of its materials.

16

(2) 4.2 I can identify licenses that are liberal Investigate and discuss more liberal licenses to see if they are fit for purpose in their projects and digital lives. Overview

Open padlock graphic More liberal licenses exist and the Internet itself is dependent on this and open source.  What does all of this mean and how does it affect the student's work?

17

(2) 4.2 I can identify licenses that are liberal   Practical, active

GNU logo Students can apply their knowledge to their own work and discuss on their blogs the importance or otherwise of this type of licensing.

18

(2) 4.3 I can ensure my work contains only appropriately licensed content  Practical exercises on how to apply the more free and pen licensing of software Overview

Men at work graphic Students need to be supported in checking their work against these criteria and understanding them enough to know when they are within the guidelines or without.

19

(2) 4.3 I can ensure my work contains only appropriately licensed content    Practical, active

Check icon More practical checks on their work and an exploration of other open source licenses to see how they operate.

20

(3) 2.3 I can identify key services provided by Internet servers Review of Internet servers which they looked at in the Year 8 SOW Overview, active

Proxy server graphic Students need to investigate and comment on some of the main services the Internet can provide for them such as web pages and email.  As shown above Internet Live Stats logo, this amounts to a lot of traffic.

21

(3) 2.3 I can identify key services provided by Internet servers   Practical, active

Firewall graphic Students can investigate the school's services and compile a dossier of what they find, including talking to the network team about what is provided and why.  What is not provided?

22

(3) 2.3 I can identify key services provided by Internet servers   Practical, active

SMS graphic Complete their overview of network services and possibly present their finding to another audience.

23

(3) 2.4 I can identify key factors that can effect server and network performance Introduction to limitations of systems, especially physical limitations. Overview, active

Sloth graphic  Students need to understand the facts and figures about networks.  20MB broadband sounds great, but if a whole school is using it, that is at times only 20kb/sec each.  What causes these performance issues?  What is wrong with a web page made with bitmaps?

24

(3) 2.4 I can identify key factors that can effect server and network performance   Practical, active

Wifi signal graphic Students should be able to look at a network and be aware of the potential of bottlenecks, as well as some idea of how to solve them.  You can use gliffy to create some diagrams with obvious and not so obvious bottlenecks for them to practice.

25

(3) 2.5 I know about permissions and basic server security Overview of what permissions are in effect on server systems and how these servers are kept secure. Overview, active

Security alarm graphic A good criterion for students to see the inner workings of the server room and discuss with the technical team why all of this is in place.  Perhaps try to address the need for balance between complete freedom of Internet access and some control for security and safety reasons.

What does your password allow you and how are servers managed.

26

(3) 2.5 I know about permissions and basic server security   Practical, active

QR code graphic What does a server allow you to do on a network.  How is it controlled.  How is control enabled on the Internet.

TLM certificates are protected by QR codes.  What does this mean.

Block 3

Link to Suggested Lesson Plan Assessment Criteria and Guidance Basic Objectives Lesson Focus / Style Notes and Suggested Resources

27

(3)  3.1 I can compare the performance of cable and wireless connections

Some general overviews of numbers and data here to explore the differences in performance of these media

Overview

Ethernet graphic Students can investigate specifications of equipment as it will be tricky to test it in reality.  Might be interesting for people to all do an Internet speed check at home (anonymise it in the table) for discussion.  How quick is Wireless. What speeds are cable and wifi.  

The BBC logo has a useful guide.

28

(3) 3.1 I can compare the performance of cable and wireless connections

  Practical, active

Wifi graphic Students can investigate the costs associated with these two systems.  This will relate the performance to the value.  If possible, you can discuss the costs to the school of Internet connectivity.  How much bandwidth do they have and how much does it cost.

You might purchase some Powerline Adapters to check their performance.

29

(3) 3.2 I can relate bandwidth to data transfer capacity

Overview and investigation into the meaning of the numbers associated with networks.

Overview, practical

Hard drive graphic A 1GB file will take 90 minutes to transfer over 1.5MB broadband, but with a dial-up modem (which many in the UK still use), it will take 42.5 hours (almost 2 days).  Useful to explore these numbers and what they mean in real terms.  There are lots of online calculators like iCalc logo that show the ratio of speed versus data size.

30

(3) 3.2 I can relate bandwidth to data transfer capacity   Overview, practical

Satelite graphic Why is fast broadband more expensive (or is it).  What is the cost.  How is transfer managed.  Who has the best service?

31

(3) 3.3 I can explain the term "contention" Straight-forward criterion which follows on from the previous ones. Overview, practical

Traffic jam graphic Students need to identify what this term means with examples.  This can be part of their blog or e-portfolio.  What happens when everyone in your street gets broadband?  What happens to the speed?

32

(3) 3.4 I can identify potential bottlenecks in network designs

Investigation of designs against specifications to look for possible problems Overview, practical Network graphic Students can look at pre-made designs of networks and have the specifications to work out what problems might theoretically occur.  Practical experience of this might be useful if you have the facilities, for example, a thin client set-up to test the server's ability to cope with n machines.

33

(3) 3.4 I can identify potential bottlenecks in network designs   Overview, practical

Broken Internet graphic More investigation into network performance and overcoming these issues.

34

(3) 3.5 I can distinguish between local and wide area networks Overview and exploration of the different types of networks that students will encounter Overview, practical

Lan graphic  Students need to have a basic understanding of the different networks they operate in and some of their characteristics.  All of the work they do in school is part of their local network, but once they use the Internet, they are out into a WAN.  Some cities have their own networks called Metropolitan Area Networks.

The BBC logo has some useful information.

35

(3) 3.5 I can distinguish between local and wide area networks   Overview, practical Free wifi graphic Continuing investigation into the characteristics of different networks.  Some appreciation of networks around them will be useful as digital literacy skills.  What is the difference between LANs and WANs?

36

(3) 3.6 I can identify protocols used in networks Overview of the main protocols that help the network operate. Overview, practical Internet cloud graphic Students need to be shown and be able to investigate what protocols help the networks function.  Students should see how http, https, ftp ,sftp and smtp basically work, especially using https to guarantee a safe connection.

37

(3) 3.6 I can identify protocols used in networks   Overview, practical SMS graphic They can investigate further protocols such as messaging systems.

38

(3) 4.3 I can identify encryption as a way of making information secure Students can demonstrate their understanding of this concept Practical, active eCommerce graphic  Students need to be safe on-line and understand all of the issues of safety, including safe systems for exchanging data such as eCommerce or other secure technologies.  A basic definition of encryption will be enough.

39

(3) 4.4 I can identify a firewall and explain its purpose As above Practical, active Firewall graphic Basic demonstration of their understanding of what a firewall is and what it does for them.  The Warriors on the Net video liste above is a good introduction.

Give yourself a pat on the back, it' all over!

Print Friendly, PDF & Email