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This scheme of work is a suggestion for KS3.  It can be delivered to all year groups, with differentiation via outcomes, though the focus on this plan is more towards Year 8.  Since this specification is new to all years, these will be introductory elements mostly.  Year 9 schemes to cover the rest of the material is here.  The () numbers at the beginning of the Assessment Criteria designate which unit it comes from.  There is also a link from there to our Guidance on Interpreting Criteria.  Most of the graphics in the body of the notes section link to web sites.  It is recommended to use these in conjunction with our on-line Mark-Book and Learning Site in order to generate evidence to earn our Ofqual regulated qualifications.

This site crowdlearn is generally useful for practicing programming skills.

Link to Suggested Lesson Plans

Assessment Criteria and Guidance Basic Objectives Lesson Focus / Style Notes and Suggested Resources

Block 1

1

(1) 2.3 I can compare algorithms

 

(3) 4.1 I can work to support an acceptable use policy

 

The main objective here is for students to show that they can understand and use algorithms reasonably comfortably Overview, instruction


Scientific steps imageStudents need to be re-introduced to algorithms, if they were in Year 7, and begin looking in more detail at how they work.  What makes them function, how do they operate, what is the best way for them to be designed.

It is not explicit here, but if this is a new year, you could do some work on AUP and passwords as this covers other criteria.

2

(1) 2.4 I can apply logic to efficiency and effectiveness of algorithms


The overall objective for this series of lessons is for students to be shown good and bad algorithms, and show that they can make their own effective and efficient
Overview

Pythagorus Students need to be introduced to the basic idea and mechanisms of logic.  Logic is at the heart of how computers work, and although they do not need to know great detail about logic itself, they need to be able to show that they understand how it works in algorithms.

This college student's algorithm is used to detect breast cancer.

3

(1) 2.4 I can apply logic to efficiency and effectiveness of algorithms


Concentrating on efficiency and the way to use it and understand it
Practical, active

Energy charts  Students need to be introduced to different algorithms and ideas relating to the concept of efficiency and effectiveness.  What makes for good efficiency.  What do we mean by effectiveness.  Normally, this means reducing the amount of code to do the same task.  Many modern operating systems are full of bloat and students will probably notice that their own home computers get slower as larger resources are used unnecessarily,

4

(1) 2.7 I can identify situations where codes control events and record physical data

This should be a general overview of how computing controls other machines.  Focus here on control. Overview


3D Printer graphic Students need to see a range of devices that can be controlled by computers.  Some schools may have 3D printers which can be explored.  You might be able to link up to a local machine company to see industrial robots in action, or at least see some via video.  Ideally, students can work on their own control.

5

(1) 2.7 I can identify situations where codes control events and record physical data A further look at computer coding, in this case for recording of data. Practical, active

CCTV The focus here might be on a weather monitoring devices or temperature control systems.  It could be the school's CCTV system which will be recording video data to a hard drive and time-stamping the data for reference.

6

(1) 3.2 I can originate useful code in a text based language

The idea here is to introduce them to text based languages such as Python.  They should be able to associate the key principles with what they learned last year with visual programs.

Some of the criterion in the above link can be reused in this criterion, for example structure, testing and de-bugging.

Overview

 Students should have been introduced to a range of visual programming tools including Blockly and Scratch, and should be able to apply these to more text based programs such as Python Logo  or Squeak Logo , or perhaps JavaScript though something like  Code Academy LogoThey can use any of these in order to create an original program.

7

(1) 3.2 I can originate useful code in a text language   Overview

Folder icon It would be useful if students could comment on their code and possibly highlight areas where they can see similarities and differences with visual languages such as Scratch.  They can use a blog or portfolio, such as our Learning Site, in order to do this.  They can then peer assess this material for the Markbook. A lot of free python resources here. 

8

(1) 4.3 I can identify reasons why some search results are likely to be more important than others This could be introduced after the half term and is a way to get students working towards the project in block 2.  The objective here is to be able to show an understanding of web based algorithms and therefore find what they want more efficiently Overview

Statistics image Using search engines is all about algorithms.  Some of the most sophisticated algorithms in the world are deployed by search engine companies, and some of the results they come up with are also ranked.  Why are web sites ranked, and how does this work in reality.

9


(1) 4.3 I can identify reasons why some search results are likely to be more important than others
  Practical

ICquick logo Students should have some idea of "value", or at least be introduced to the idea as it works in content on the Internet.  The idea of "importance" could be seen as quite subjective.  Web site results are ranked based on certain algorithms, but they can also be adjusted to suit particular needs.  They go to the top of a search and are therefore seen as more important, but it might mean that they are a big client of the search engine company and have paid a lot of money to be there.

10

(1) 4.5 I can use search techniques to improve efficiency of finding information Students just need to be aware and have evidence that they can use wild cards for searches Practical, active

Question mark image The use of a wild card helps to search for a wide range of material when you are not completely sure what you are looking for, i.e. *.mpg to find all the .mpg files on a computer or in an Internet search.  Students need to show that they understand that it is an option that can be deployed.

Use of tips to make searches more efficient.  Also understand the use of quotes to refine searches.

11

(2) 1.1 I can select suitable applications to support my work The overall objective here will be to get students researching and thinking about completing a project in the next block Overview

Software box graphic Students will investigate and evaluate different applications in order to carry out a data collection and analysis project in the next block.  This can be carried out in any subject, though something like science or DT might be the most suitable.

12

(2) 1.1 I can select suitable applications to support my work Students will continue to investigate and research different applications Practical, active

GPS image What makes the application suitable for data collection and analysis?  How good is it at the task required?  How much effort is there in getting it to work the way they would like.

13

(2) 1.1 I can select suitable applications to support my work

Students will decide which application to use and begin planning for a project on data collection in the next block

Students should have chosen a range of applications and justified their use for the following project

Practical, active

Presentation image Students will need a range of applications: one to write up their findings; one to collect data; one to analyze data (could be the same); one to present their findings.

Block 2

Link to Suggested Lesson Plan Assessment Criteria and Guidance Basic Objectives Lesson Focus / Style Notes and Suggested Resources

14

(2) 1.2 I can collect and record data Refresher about project Overview

Wireless sensor image Students need a refresher on the project they have undertaken, or time to finalize, and then work on their project to collect data, analyze it and present their findings.

It would be good to introduce a range of data collection methods and tools, and use cross departmental resources as required.

nQuire-IT logo

This site has some excellent ideas for data collection and analysis and they even provide a smartphone app for collection purposes (search for Sense-it app on Play or iTunes).

15

(2) 1.2 I can collect and record data Spend time gathering the results. Practical, active

Guage image Students will continue to gather their results and possibly do some error checking to make sure it is working the way they want it to..  It would not be good to have a lot of bad data at the end.

16

(2) 1.2 I can collect and record data Collating the results ready for some analysis Practical, active

Noice image Students can now do a final gather of data and do some checking on the quality and look for any errors that will distort the data.

17

(2) 1.3 I can find patterns in data Students should now have some data to look at and they can analyze it for any patterns which will give them results Overview

Climate chart image Patterns in data generally tend to reveal results.  Students need to use their chosen application to analyse the data they have gathered to look for results.  If they gathered data on temperature at the school, what could account for a high or low which is beyond all the other readings.  If they gathered data through surveys or questionnaires, what could account for so many people of a certain age or background answering a certain way.

NB – could use electric rate check plug for energy efficiency and see the differences, or network monitor on firewall?

18

(2) 1.3 I can find patterns in data   Practical, active

Japanese Folk Wave image Students can be introduced to other data sets and see if they can determine some of the anomalies or spikes and try to explain what they might be, while completing their own data analysis.

19

(2) 1.4 I can present data effectively Students should be able to choose the right application to present their findings Overview

White board image Depending on the nature of the data they collect, students need to be able to turn it into information.  They need to create graphics and other visual elements to make the presentation as accessible as possible.

20

(2) 1.4 I can present data effectively   Practical, active

Audience image Students could present their data to peers or other students in different departments to make sure they get good feedback on what they have.

You could get students to use free online presentation tools such as emaze or Powtoon logo, or Empressr logo

21

(2) 1.5 I can meet the needs of other people Students will have looked at this criterion as previously, but need to make this particular project on data collection match the needs of the "client" Overview, active

Magnifying glass image The students need to be introduced to a range of material and writings, perhaps from other departments, that allow them to explore the ways in which projects can be designed to meet an audience needs or the needs of a particular person, especially in relation to the application.  For example, if the person they are collecting data for is not good with numbers, the presentation of the data to them would not be suitable in a purely number format and might best be presented purely as graphs alone.  Equally, too much text for younger readers might not work, or not enough text for more literate people would not be suitable.

22

(2) 1.5 I can meet the needs of other people   Practical, active

Clipboard It would be useful for students to design a survey or feedback form in order to get some comments from the people they designed their data collection system for to see if it met their needs, and how well.

Thumbs up icon Students can complete this task by reflecting, perhaps on their blog or portfolio, about how well it worked or otherwise and why it is important to design things for people's needs.

23

(2) 1.6 I can use more than one application to solve a particular problem Students need to be introduced to a range of applications, so that they can choose the most effective ones for their needs Overview, active

Handshake via monitors image  The project here will involve various applications.  Since 4.4 below involves the use and valuation of open source applications, these should be part of this process of discovery and evaluation here.

24

(2) 1.6 I can use more than one application to solve a particular problem   Overview, active

Man thinking image Students can continue to investigate alternative packages, linked in to the criterion below.

25

(2) 4.4 I can find open source equivalents for many proprietary software applications Demonstrating an understanding of open source software as alternatives to proprietary systems Overview, active

Padlock image The government recently announced an initiative to use open source applications throughout it's range of services.  There are plenty of good open source alternatives for any paid for package. 

26

(2) 4.4 I can find open source equivalents for many proprietary software applications   Overview, active

Open Source Initiative logo There are various organisations which support and promote Open Source, including this one.  There are also organisations you can join to help promote Open Source such as Open Source Consortium logo

Block 3

Link to Suggested Lesson Plan Assessment Criteria and Guidance Basic Objectives Lesson Focus / Style Notes and Suggested Resources

27

(3) 1.4 I can compare hardware components on the basis of their properties

Students need to show that they understand the key hardware components and can list the main properties

Overview, practical

External hard drive image Students will have been introduced to some components of computers in the previous SOW, but need to consolidate this knowledge and show that they understand what the properties are and how they are important.

28

(3) 1.4 I can compare hardware components on the basis of their properties

  Overview, practical Capacitor image It might be good for students to construct a table of results and comparisons for future reference.  This could be on a spreadsheet or a table on their online portfolio.

29

(3) 1.5 I can identify power consumption and performance as key limits on hardware

Students need to be shown and show that they understand power consumption.

Overview, practical

Powerline image Hardware companies are constantly refining their hardware components.  One key drive here is the drive to mobile devices where power consumption is critical.  However, with reduced power sometimes comes reduced performance.  Students should understand the relationship and know how to choose the best components.

30

(3) 1.5 I can identify power consumption and performance as key limits on hardware   Overview, practical

Battery image Students can compile a table of comparisons with various hardware components.  What are the key comparisons.  Is there a good compromise?  Why does it matter?

31

(3) 1.6 I can identify cost as an issue in performance. Students should show an awareness that low cost generally means low performance. Overview, practical

 Atom based systems work well and are very low on power consumption, but are they adequate for particular jobs?  Could an Atom processor based system run an Oculus Logo

32

(3) 2.1 I can identify a server in a network diagram

Students should be shown a basic network setup and be able to identify the key servers or server Overview, practical Server image Students can work with the IT technical department to look at networking and diagrams and be able to ask some questions so that they can reflect and compile the information on their blog or online portfolio

33

(3) 2.2 I can identify a range of servers and services provided by servers to networks. Linked to the above activity, students need to know that different servers operate in a network setup.  Working with the IT technicians or a county networking company could be useful Overview, practical

Mail server image Students need to be given a tour of a server facility, where possible, or at least shown the different servers in a network and the tasks they perform.  Some of these will be hardware based, some will be software.

 

Most networks will have their main file server, to keep the students work, but might also have a web server, printing server, mail server and active directory server for logins.

34

(3) 2.2 I can identify a range of servers and services provided by servers to networks.   Overview, practical

Web server image Students can continue to explore what servers and services the school has or be shown different services and servers from documents and videos.

Chances are, your school uses the Microsoft web server called IIS (Internet Information Services) which is a software which comes with a Windows server license.  However, only 13% of current web sites are served from Microsoft systems.  The dominant web server is Apache logo Apache

35

(3) 2.2 I can identify a range of servers and services provided by servers to networks.   Overview, practical Email image As with web servers, mail servers are dominated by open source systems such as Postfix, Sendmail and Qmail, which together server over 60% of all the world's email.  

36

(3) 4.1 I can work to support an acceptable use policy Students need to show that they are aware of the school's AUP and what it is for Overview, practical CCTV image Students can look in some detail at the school's or other organisation's AUP and deconstruct the details.  They could try and make up their own AUP as an addendum.

37

(3) 4.1 I can work to support an acceptable use policy   Overview, practical FBI man image Students can perhaps do a presentation on their interpretation of AUP to other students.  This will help them to fully understand it and why following it is important.

38

(3) 4.4 I can identify ways of minimising spam and eliminating malware Students should investigate and evaluate different types of spam and malware. Look at where is comes from and what it does, Practical, active  Spam imageStudents should look at firewalls and anti virus systems, as well as look at aspects of their behaviours, if not looked at previously, in order to prevent unwanted software and emails.

39

(3) 4.4 I can identify ways of minimising spam and eliminating malware As above Practical, active  Malware imageStudents can be shown examples of spam and malware, if appropriate, to discuss and explore the way it works and the intended purpose.
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