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This scheme of work is a suggestion for KS3.  It can be delivered to all year groups initially, with differentiation by outcome, though the focus is more towards Year 7.  (Year 8 is here) Since this specification is new to all years, these will be introductory elements mostly.  Year 9 schemes to cover the rest of the KS3 POS to follow.  The () numbers at the beginning of the Assessment Criteria designate which unit it comes from.  There is also a link from there to our Guidance on Interpreting Criteria.  Most of the graphics in the body of the notes section link to web sites.  It is recommended to use these in conjunction with our on-line Mark-Book and Learning Site in order to generate evidence to earn our Ofqual regulated qualifications.

In addition to the materials and links listed below and in the linked lesson plans, there are also lots of excellent resources here BBC logo This site crowdlearn is generally useful for practicing programming skills.

Link to Suggested Lesson Plans

Assessment Criteria and Guidance Basic Objectives Lesson Focus / Style Notes and Suggested Resources

Block 1

1

(2) 3.4 I can apply e-safety principles to my project

 

(3) 4.2 I can choose a strong network password and keep it secure

Introduce the main ideas of e-safety, check current knowledge Overview, instruction

Server This introductory lesson can be used in a very general way to introduce new students to your network and returning students to remind them of e-safety best practices and the reasons behind them.

The  dictionary here is very useful.Computer Hope

2

 

(2) 3.4 I can apply e-safety principles to my project

 

(3) 4.2 I can choose a strong network password and keep it secure

Consolidate understanding and build on previous lesson.  Set password understanding for school system and complete key terms in e-safety Practical, active

e-safety Building on the previous lesson's knowledge and understanding, the key here is to work on some practical application of the knowledge.  Students should end up with a clear understanding of good password practice: defining and maintaining.  A strong password Padlock is not an easy thing to use, but is essential.  They should also be comfortable in defining and dealing with the listed terms of e-safety in the SOW.

3

(1) 1.1 I can develop abstractions to represent physical objects

Introduction to drawing software and file types Overview

Abstraction The suggestion here is to use a drawing program such as Inkscape logo to introduce the idea of abstraction since this will be more meaningful and accessible.  This knowledge can then be built upon once the notion is applied to abstraction in programming and should have a good foundation.

4

(1) 1.1 I can develop abstractions to represent physical objects

Practical, interactive.  Display knowledge Practical, active

Abstraction Building on the previous lesson's knowledge and understanding, there should be scope here for some practical application and consolidation.  Try the MIT App Inventor for up to date material.  Students can create apps on their computer, then test them on Android devices.

5

(1) 1.2 I can use data patterns to represent physical objects Introduction to flow-charts, visual coding Overview

Flow-chart The students can use various flow-chart tools, but online ones such as Gliffy logo are quite easy and accessible. They can be introduced to a range of visual systems to show how this flow and coding works visually, before they use the text based versions and higher concepts.  These programs will all be useful.  Turtle image, Scratch logo,      Blockly logoBlockly does have a logo application called Turtle Graphics as well.  The The Code Academy is also a very useful resource as it shows you what your code does and why, with hints.

Coder project logo a new project from Google employees to code web pages on a Pi.

6

(1) 1.2 I can use data patterns to represent physical objects Practical exercises on various software systems: scratch, logo etc Practical, active

Data patterns Students should have the opportunity to practice their skills and gain a deeper understanding of visual programming and how one object can represent another.  This will introduce the later concepts such as variables.

7

(1) 1.3 I can follow instructions to develop a software abstraction Introduction to how instructions work in programming, overview of Logo, Scratch, Blockly etc. Overview

Directions Student need to be shown a variety of ways that computers are used to turn instructions into actions  If the school allows, you can also use Code Combat logo which is a fun way to show both the code and the action it creates on objects.

Trinket logo is good for showing some Python code in action.

8

(1) 1.3 I can follow instructions to develop a software abstraction Group work to develop an abstraction to present to class Practical, active

Abstract faceStudents should now have an understanding of the concept of abstraction which they can apply to the way that computer programming works.  The programs they used earlier will all be useful.  Turtle Academy logo, Scratch logo,      Blockly logoBlockly does have a logo application called Turtle Graphics as well.  The The Code Academy is also a very useful resource as it shows you what your code does and why, with hints.

9

(1) 1.4 I can use software abstractions that model real world systems Look at and evaluate as a class various abstraction software Overview

Model of valine Students have been introduced to software such as the Numpty Physics system.  . Numpty Physics is a good visual way to show how they can control a computer, but also introduce the idea of abstraction since the program emulate gravity in a fun way. They should now have the opportunity to try adjusting the elements of these programs to see the effect and begin to understand the modeling of real world objects by computers.

10

(1) 1.4 I can use software abstractions that model real world systems Group work to practice and understand the workings of the software systems Practical, active

Relational Database modelMost of the software systems that allow students to work with models tend to be game like, so this could be restrictive in terms of your network.  There are some good science simulations at PHET logo though it will require java to run on the browser.  The simulations allow students to alter inputs to see the effects.

11

(1) 1.5 I can identify strengths and weaknesses in computer models Overview of good software.  What makes software good or bad. Overview

Strenght Students will need to be introduced to the idea of good quality software and open source.  What models have they seen that they understand and will use again?  What was good about the abstraction models?  What was bad?

12

(1) 1.5 I can identify strengths and weaknesses in computer models Class based, instructor led exercises on models Practical, active

Incredible Tux imageStudents now need to practice what they have learned about these programs, but also begin to make notes about what is good and bad about them, what could be improved.

13

(1) 1.5 I can identify strengths and weaknesses in computer models Group work on computer models, presentation in groups of strengths and weaknesses identified Practical, active

Broken twig imageConsolidate the evaluation of the different systems introduced and get students to list and discuss the strengths and weaknesses they have discovered.

Block 2

Link to Suggested Lesson Plan Assessment Criteria and Guidance Basic Objectives Lesson Focus / Style Notes and Suggested Resources

14

(1) 2.1 I can write algorithms for everyday tasks Introduction to instructions and clarity, how things work Overview

Donlad Knuth Using the website resources on  CS Unplugged logo students can begin to investigate the use and action of algorithms and begin to understand their power and simplicity.  Some fun activities will help to clarify the term.

15

(1) 2.1 I can write algorithms for everyday tasks Group work on making instructions and testing them Practical, active

This lesson will focus on students writing their own algorithms and sharing them for peer review and discussion.  The lesson should begin to look at the aspects of testing and looking for bugs Bug image

16

(1) 2.2 I can identify different algorithms that target the same task More class based work on "deconstructing" algorithms Practical, active

To do list On the surface, algorithms, at least in computing, may seem complicated, but breaking them down into understandable actions should make their purpose clearer.  For example, can students create a simple set of instructions for their group.  Test it out and see the results.  All students should be familiar with the traffic light algorithm.

17

(1) 2.2 I can identify different algorithms that target the same task Checking for understanding and ability to formulate clear algorithms Practical, active

The world's largest company uses algorithms in it's flagship product Google logoand also therefore has a good grasp of what algorithms do and how they can be used.   Use some of the key words in the link here to discuss and explore with students how these are used.  They can practice some of these ideas in their instructions and reflect on them on their learning site.

18

(1) 2.5 I can change variables in an algorithm and predict the effect Introduction to variables Overview

Predict weather We are now working towards how actual programs will work once students begin to work on them.  We have been dealing with various abstractions, but relating these to instructions, we are now looking at using variables to represent data.  It should all be starting to make some sense now.  You will need to provide a variety of systems to be able to play with variables.  An online demo database  AppGini logoshould be helpful.

19

(1) 2.5 I can change variables in an algorithm and predict the effect Extended activities to consolidate an understanding of variables and their effects when changed Practical, active

Use the above database and Google logo to practice the taught skills and get students to begin to document their understanding and questions.  You can look at alternative ways to show information such as the new Squiffy logo search engine.  Students can compare various engines for what they find which will show the quality and perhaps motivation of search engine algorithms.

20

(1) 2.6 I know how instructions and data are stored Introduce students to the effect of instructions and how they can affect the end result Overview, active

Database abstraction You can use the TLM learning site to show students the way that HTML code can impact a web site's look and feel.  Put some HTML tags on the board and get them to try them out and see the effects.  The learning site, or something like WordPress allows students to see the HTML code and the visual end result by switching tabs.  They can also use the W3Schools site.

21

(1) 2.6 I know how data and instructions are stored Dive a little deeper into instructions and data: how do they operate, what are the best practices etc Overview, active

Data and information graphicThis is an important transition lesson between understanding what the students deal with all the time, their language, and the language of computers.  This should reinforce why we use abstractions and instructions when dealing with data.   Students need to see that different data has different properties: why word processors can't manipulate audio files, only embed them.

22

(1) 3.2 I can originate useful code in a visual language The focus here should probably be on a project covering all the following lessons, but incorporating these elements for assessment.  Demonstrating the use of their own code Overview, active

Logo generated image Start the lesson by introducing some aspects of coding in the various systems (Scratch, Logo etc).  There are some good tutorials hereCode.org logo

Talk about some of the key things like direction and numbers needed.  Students need to work on their chosen program to get it to work and document the code they use and the choices they need to make for it to work effectively.  They should also note down any problems they had.

Game Mechanic logo If your centre allows.

You can use our own Game Design site to practise some programming skills.  The source code is available to download and modify, as well as the graphics, to see the effects.

23

(1) 3.3 I can identify structure in programs Demonstrating a program with the correct structure Overview, active

Structure and order Introduce the lesson by reviewing some of the key aspects that make up a program, such as setting out the author details, using comments and the various sub-elements needed.  Students can then continue working on their own program and including these features.

24

(1) 3.4 I can test code Demonstrating the ability to do some testing Overview, active

Check list Introduce the idea of testing to the students by showing them worked examples and possibly using some of their work to illustrate.  Make sure they understand the importance of testing.  Students can then work on their own tests and documenting the results for their evidence.

25

(1) 3.5 I can edit source code to fix a bug Demonstrating the ability to test for and fix bugs Overview, active

Editing code This is a continuation of the previous lesson as students should still be testing and evaluating their system. You might draw up some of their own evidence to support what the group as a whole are doing.  You could talk about how code review is an important part of industry programming.  Give some clear examples of bugs.

26

(1) 3.6 I can chose variable names that aide clarity Demonstrating an understanding and use of good quality variable names to aide the program's function Overview, active

Naming Introduce this lesson with a discussion and examples of variable names and why they are important.  Try to show that what is obvious to them is not going to be obvious to others.  You could invite in a member of staff or student from another area of the curriculum and see if they can understand the chosen variables.  Students should now complete their project and be assessed overall.

Block 3

Link to Suggested Lesson Plan Assessment Criteria and Guidance Basic Objectives Lesson Focus / Style Notes and Suggested Resources

27

(2) 2.1 I can originate original digital information from my
own imagination

(2) 3.5 I can show courage in completing a project

The objective in this series of lessons is for students to be comfortable enough with computing systems and their language to build their own programs or routines in any chosen subject.

Overview, practical

Project Management graphic The idea here is for the students to use some aspect of their technological skills to support their learning.  It does not have to be a computing or ICT based project, but can be any subject.

  • In English search the Gutenberg Logo for a classic text and present it in a web page with their own review. What did they like? what didn't they like?
  • In Maths use a vector drawing program to draw points, lines, parallel lines, perpendicular lines, right angles, regular polygons, and other polygons, that are reflectively and rotationally symmetric labeling them.  Export to .png for display in a web page.
  • In art, photograph one of their paintings and enhance it using image processing software such as GIMP.
  • In music use a scoring program to compose some music and print the score.
  • In geography make a contribution to the Open Street Map logo
  • In design and technology build a fire alarm system using a temperature sensor computer controller and sound effects.
  • In languages use Google Translate and Google Hangouts to do a joint project with children the same age in another country.

Make sure to introduce the concept of timelines and deadlines.

28

(2) 2.2 I can use remix to create original digital information

(2) 2.3 I can use specific design techniques

Students need to be able to demonstrate skills in various computer programs to create the required material for their chosen subject area, i.e. graphics for web sites, formatted word processing such as a book etc. Overview, practical Introduce some elements of basic design and good practice and support the students as they develop their specific projects.

29

(2) 2.4 I can match my work to a target audience

(2) 3.1 I can structure a plan for a project supported by digital tools

Students should demonstrate that they can put together a reasonable plan and stick to it as much as possible, or at least show why they couldn't stick to it.

The plan should show things like the use of the tools they are using and why they have chosen them if possible

Overview, practical

People graphic Introduce the importance of meeting an audience's expectations and that it is not just to please the students themselves.

Use some aspect of planning, perhaps working with flow-charts to get students to appreciate their time and deadlines where possible.  They could use something like Lino logo to visualize the plan points.  Project management software is quite complex, but you could show what companies use with demos such as qdPM or others.

Also useful to introduce tools to gather audience or "client" perspectives.  LimeSurvey logo is a great open source tool which we are building into our Learning Site for our customers.  You can create great surveys to get data and perspectives on audience needs, as well as evaluation and feedback.

30

(2) 3.2 I can carry out projects by linking a sequence of steps Students should demonstrate some aspect of a timeline and meeting deadlines.  If they can create their own system, or use an open source one, this will help them with further projects in later years Overview, practical

Traffic lights As part of the planning, students will hopefully have been shown and developed their own project management system.  This could be a spreadsheet or something else.  Re-introduce this and check where the students are.  Support them in this process as it is very important.

Project management tools are quite useful for students to map out their timelines and work to deadlines.  We have set up an eGroupWare logo system for our customers to make it easier to show planning, timelines, and project management.

31

(2) 3.3 I can evaluate a project in terms of its strengths and weaknesses Students should be able to show an understanding of strong and weak points of their design.  They might also be able to peer assess the other student's work and work collaboratively Overview, practical

Introduce and show what evaluation is.  They will have done some already i a previous lesson, but it is important to keep reinforcing this and giving guidance.

Get students to share their ways of evaluating.  Can they show good quality evaluation?  Are they too hard/soft on themselves?  Can they use and accept peer review?

32

(2) 3.3 I can evaluate a project in terms of its strengths and weaknesses

(2) 3.5 I can show courage in completing a project

Students should complete their project which will be t an audience expectation and timelines and deadlines.  This should show them that planning is important, but also that they showed great courage in doing it.  Overview, practical Students should be assisted in completing their project ready for submission.  They can be shown some techniques for reflection which can be fed into their blog or portfolio if using the TLM learning site.

33

(3) 1.1 I can identify the main hardware components in computing devices Students need to be introduced, either physically or virtually, to the main parts that make up a computer system Overview, practical

MotherboardIf you have access to old computers, try to disassemble one.  Pupils make a list of the components as the computer is built.

34

(3) 1.1 I can identify the main hardware components in computing devices Students should begin to compile this knowledge and understanding to show they have understood what the parts are they have been introduced to Overview, practical

Continue investigating the various parts of computers and explaining their purpose.

35

(3) 1.1 I can identify the main hardware components in computing devices Student should be shown the disassembly and re-assembly of a computer. Overview, practical Get students to document what the parts are on their portfolio and what they do.

36

(3) 1.2 I can match discreet components in computing devices to purpose Students should be able to apply their knowledge of components to real-world situations. Overview, practical RAM Set a task for students to create a catalogue of available computer hardware for the school with details about what the components would be used for and some of their key features.  The catalogue needs to include the purpose of the components to match the criterion.

37

(3) 1.2 I can match discreet components in computing devices to purpose Students should consolidate their understanding and demonstrate a depth of knowledge Overview, practical Students can continue putting together their reference document on the portfolio for evidence

38

(3) 1.3 I can classify hardware on the basis of purpose Students can demonstrate their understanding Practical, active Storage Students can be given a brief to find computers and produce a report for a client.  Each will have a different purpose and need in terms of hardware.  Students can show they can meet this requirement by showing the "client" the detail about the hardware's purpose, strengths and weaknesses.

39

(3) 1.3 I can classify hardware on the basis of purpose As above Practical, active Students need to collect and collate their evidence into a short report for submission and assessment.
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